Bacon-Wrapped Venison Backstrap Roast

Venison is as organic as it gets! It also has less cholesterol than turkey and 50% less fat than beef. This tender venison roast is marinated in teriyaki marinade, then wrapped in bacon before roasting. Perfect for the last weekend of deer season in Alabama. Yum!

Bacon-Wrapped Venison Backstrap

For my family, it is also drastically less expensive than beef because my husband and son are avid hunters and we have a deep freeze full of venison hamburger, sausage, tenderloin, and stew meat. I often mix one pound of ground venison with one pound of 80/20 ground beef because venison is extremely lean.

This week alone, I used the combination of ground venison and ground beef for meatloaf and shepherd’s pie.

If these reasons aren’t enough to sway you over to the wild side of the freezer, check out these 27 Benefits of Harvesting and Eating Wild Venison: A Look at Venison vs. Beef

I have to give my husband, Scott, photo creds for the above picture. He prepared this roast completely on his own, including wrapping the bacon and roasting it in the oven.

Venison Backstrap Roast 1

This roast was cooked to somewhere between medium and medium-well to suit me (the Queen of this domain), but the men in the house prefer it more on the medium-rare side. I recommend using a digital in-oven meat thermometer. It takes all the guess work out of reaching exactly the internal temperature you desire.

In case you didn’t know, the internal temperature will continue to rise about 5 degrees after you remove it from the oven, so, if you want your roast to end up at 150 degrees, take it out of the oven at 145 degrees.

The reason for letting it stand 10 minutes before slicing isn’t to let it cool down enough to eat. While cooking, the heat causes the juices to head toward the center of the roast. If you cut it immediately, you will lose all those juices. If you let it rest just a few minutes, it gives it time to reabsorb the juices making the roast juicier. Ok. Enough of the food science-I just love it, though!

Scott Processing deer

Scott prepped and cooked this roast and took the how-to pics with his phone. Here he is trimming the silver skin. It is a very lean cut of meat so not much fat to trim . We use a FoodSaver vacuum sealer at this point if we were going to freeze it. It seems like it more than doubles the freezer life of the meat.

After marinating the roast and draining it, arrange 8 pieces of bacon side by side on a work surface or cutting board. Lay two pieces of bacon in the middle end to end.

marinated venison on raw bacon

Place the roast on top of the pieces of bacon that are touching end to end and pull these two pieces up, covering the ends of the roast and lay them on top of the roast. Then, pull up the crosswise pieces of bacon and over lap them on top of the roast and two pieces of bacon covering the ends.

bacon wrapped venison before cooking

Secure the bacon with toothpicks or flip the roast, seam side down, to make sure the bacon doesn’t shrink when baked. Place in a small, greased aluminum foil-lined roasting pan or baking dish.

venison bacon wrapped roast

Baked sliced venison roast

If your husband or son do not hunt, you can still make this yummy roast with beef tenderloin or pork loin.

I couldn’t resist throwing in a picture of my guys all decked out in camo. It’s an older picture (Grayson is now 18) but it shows how much fun they have being outdoors together.

 

ScottGraysonOFFfishing2012

Spend some time with your dad this father’s day hunting, fishing, golfing or just sitting on the front porch swapping stories. Make some memories!

I also love a good old-fashioned fish fry!

Bacon-Wrapped Venison Backstrap Roast
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Resting time
10 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 
If you’re like me, you either have a freezer full of venison from last year’s hunting season or about to fill it up with this season’s harvest. My husband and son are avid hunters and we process our own meat which helps on the grocery bill and I love the guarantee there’s no added water, coloring, chemicals, or hormones. Backstrap is excellent cooked and served medium-rare but my family prefers medium.
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6 servings
Author: GritsAndGouda.com
Ingredients
  • 1 2 pound venison backstrap roast
  • 1/2 cup teriyaki marinade I used Moore’s because it’s an Alabama-made product
  • 10 slices applewood-smoked bacon center cut slices are not long enough
Instructions
  1. Place the roast in a large zip-top plastic bag and add the marinade. Seal the bag and
  2. marinate in the refrigerator at least 8 hours or overnight, turning once.
  3. Preheat oven to 375°. Remove the roast from the bag and drain. Discard the marinade.
  4. Arrange 8 pieces of bacon side by side on a work surface or cutting board. Lay two
  5. pieces of bacon in the middle end to end.
  6. Place the roast on top of the pieces of bacon that are touching end to end and pull these
  7. two pieces up, covering the ends of the roast and lay them on top of the roast. Then, pull
  8. up the crosswise pieces of bacon and over lap them on top of the roast and two pieces of
  9. bacon covering the ends. Secure the bacon with toothpicks or flip the roast, seam side
  10. down, to make sure the bacon doesn’t shrink when baked. Place in a small, greased
  11. aluminum foil-lined roasting pan or baking dish. Bake at 375° for 20 to 25 minutes for
  12. medium-rare or 25 to 30 minutes for medium. Let roast stand in the pan 10 minutes.
  13. Remove toothpicks, if used. Cut roast on a cutting board and transfer to a serving
  14. platter and cut into slices.

 

Advertisements

Author: gritsandgouda

Hi! I’m Kathleen. I’m a food stylist, recipe developer, cookbook author, and event planner loving life in a charming town called Gardendale, Alabama, with my husband and two teenage children. I love to cook and laugh…not necessarily in that order.

Leave a Reply